Arizona Registrar of Contractors

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Licensed, Bonded and Insured?

Just because the ad says it doesn't mean it's true!

Many complaints about unlicensed contractors are received where the home or business owner believed they had contracted with a Licensed, Bonded and Insured contractor, but they had not. The ads that appear in the yellow pages are not regulated by the publisher, and should be considered accurate only about the name of the company or individual and the phone number to call. The only sure way of knowing that your contractor is licensed is to call the Registrar of Contractors to confirm it.

With the technology available today, the local phone number you think you are calling may be being answered by a telemarketer in some other state. Such operations may not even be licensed in Arizona, and you might be paying thousands of dollars down on work that will never be performed or completed.

Nothing in the law prevents a property owner from building or making improvements to structures or appurtenances on his or her own property, and do the work themselves, or with their own employees or with a duly licensed contractor as long as certain conditions are met.
  1. The work is intended for occupancy solely by the owner and is not intended for occupancy by the public, by employees or business visitors.
    AND
  2. The structure or appurtenances are not intended for sale or rent for a period of at least one year from the date of completion or issuance of a certificate of occupancy.

This section of the statute is intended to make insure that potential buyers, renters, employees or business visitors to a premise are not put in jeopardy. In such situations where the structures or appurtenances will be utilized by or open to the public, their health, welfare and public safety must be protected, and licensed contractors must be utilized to complete the project. Also, you must keep in mind that you are still subject to compliance with local permit and building code requirements. Homeowner Associations may also place restrictions on what you may build, and how it can be constructed in accordance with your Covenants, Conditions & Restrictions, (CC&R's).


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